Mount Locust

Mount Locust 1

Mount Locust 1

 

During the mid to late 1700s the Natchez Trace was basically the area’s first “super highway. The Trace was an important route used by “Kaintucks”. These were boatmen who would bring goods down the Mississippi River in flat or keel boats and either walk back to their homes located in the Ohio, Tennessee and Cumberland River valleys, or buy a horse and ride.

 

Mount Locust 2

Mount Locust 2

 

 

Mount Locust 3

Mount Locust 3

 

Along the way there were places called “Stands”. Each stand was located about the distance that it would take a person to travel in a day. A person could find a meal and lodging at these places for about 25 cents a night. One such stand was Mount Locust. It was constructed during the time of the American Revolution by John Blommart.  Stands like Mount Locust provided welcome stopping points along the Natchez Trace. Think of it as Motel One. You can even hear Tom Bodett telling everyone that “we’ll leave a candle burning for you”.

 

Mount Locust 4

Mount Locust 4

 

Mount Locust 5

Mount Locust 5

 

 

Mount Locust 6

Mount Locust 6

 

After the Revolutionary War the Spanish were in controlled the all of the Southern Gulf Coast. Blommart ran into trouble with the Spanish and ended up losing his home and fortune.

 

Muscadine Vineyard

Muscadine Vineyard

 

However, Mount Locust still survived. By 1825, foot travel on the Trace had all but ended, although a few inns like Mount Locust continued to serve visitors with food and lodging for some years to come. It eventually was sold to the Chamberlain family and became a cotton plantation.

 

 

 

 

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14 Comments

  1. Len Saltiel July 13, 2012 at 4:49 am #

    Terrific images Phillip especially the second one. That’s also an interesting name – Mt Locust

    • Phillip July 16, 2012 at 7:50 pm #

      Thank you Len. The name is interesting, and I couldn’t find any information on it. I would love to know the story.

  2. Victoria July 14, 2012 at 2:55 am #

    Very nice photos!

  3. Jimi Jones July 16, 2012 at 7:05 am #

    Love these images, Phillip. So nicely processed. The B&W conversions are very nice as well. That 3rd shot (B&W) is particularly nice.

    • Phillip July 16, 2012 at 7:53 pm #

      I really appreciate the comment Jimi. After I finished the color I had to try B/W.

  4. Otto von Münchow July 17, 2012 at 5:55 am #

    A very nice series of pictures of Mount Locust. They tell the story about times gone by with engagement and insight. I love the way you have play with the graphic expressions. My favourite picture is Mount Locust 2. Wonderful colours and an expressive captured detail.

    • Phillip July 18, 2012 at 10:09 pm #

      Thank you Otto for such an encouraging comment. I really appreciate it. I processed it with LightRoom 3 and Viveza 2. Then I used Snap Art 3 to add the finishing touches to it.

  5. Edith Levy July 17, 2012 at 10:30 pm #

    What a fascinating place. Wonderful series of images Phillip.

    • Phillip July 18, 2012 at 10:03 pm #

      I really appreciate it Edith!

  6. Rob July 18, 2012 at 8:44 am #

    Excellent images, Phillip. A joy to learn a bit of our history here.

    • Phillip July 18, 2012 at 10:02 pm #

      Thank you Rob, I really enjoy learning about history this way.

  7. Andrew Graeme Gould July 18, 2012 at 1:51 pm #

    Very interesting background on this site, Phillip. I particularly like the detail shot of the bag and hat, as well as the forest scene. The black and white variations are attractive, although I personally go for the warmth of the colour images.

    • Phillip July 18, 2012 at 10:01 pm #

      I appreciate it Andrew. They had these displayed as seen, and they just seemed so natural. I’m not sure which of the forest scenes I like the most. I like the warmth of the color too, but the B/W is appealing as well. Even though they are the same, they are so different.

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